Blessings & Good Wishes

Ní thardda lí tassi form!

Ní thardda lí tassi form!

(not * may it bring * color * of corpse * on-me)

May it not put the color of a corpse on me! = May I not die!

This wish is found in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus ii 352.18.

M'anaim, mo chorp, mo cheol,

M'anaim, mo chorp is mo cheol,
rob saer ar olc, ar aineol.

my * soul * my * body * and * my * music
may they be * free * from * evil * from * ignorance

May my soul, my body, and my music
be free from evil and from ignorance.

This half stanza ends a poem in the Metrical Dindshenchas on Mag Luirg. In the last stanza in the version of poem found in the Book of Ballymote the poet turns away from his subject and expresses his wish for himself. I have emended “corp" and “ceol” to show their expected lenition.

Ar-dot·raib bennacht co brath!

Ar-dot·raib bennacht co brath!

(may-be-before-you * blessing * until * doomsday)

May blessings await you always!

Like "Rop lir do chlann", this blessing is found in a poem in a genealogy in the manuscript Rawl. B 502 (fol. 87r) which is held in the Bodleian Library at Oxford.

Rop lir do chlann gainim lir!

Rop lir do chlann gainim lir!

(may-be * as numerous * your * offspring * as sands * of sea)

May your progeny be as numerous as the sands of the sea!

This blessing is put in the mouth of Saint Patrick in a poem in "Genelach Conmaicne", which is found in the MS Rawl. 502 (fol. 87r) in the Bodleian Library, Oxford.

Rop réid rémunn cech n-aimreid!

Rop réid rémunn cech n-aimreid!

(may be * smooth * before-us * every * unsmoothness)

May every rough spot before us be smooth.
May every difficulty before us be easy.

This is a line from "Hymnus S. Colmani Mic Ui Cluasaigh" in the Irish Liber Hymnorum, edited by J. H. Bernard and R. Atkinson (London, 1898).

Sonus lomma ...

Sonus lomma is lenna lir,
buáid comairle in cech caingin,
búaid comperta, clú co mbail,
búaid creiche adiu, buáid slúagaid.

(luck * of milk * and * of ale * plentiful
victory * of counsel * in * every * affair
victory * of conception * fame * with * prosperity
victory * of raid * from here * victory * of military expedition)

Luck of milk and of plentiful ale,
successful advice in every matter,
success in procreation, fame with prosperity,
success in raiding hence, and victory in war.

A blessing from St. Colmán in Betha Colmáin maic Lúacháin, edited by Kuno Meyer in Todd Lecture Series, No. 17.

Bendacht duine, bendacht Dé ...

Bendacht duine, bendacht Dé,
robet ort ule 'malle,
fort chlaind, fort chiniud cen cess
nachus·tarla anfaitchess.

(blessing * of man * blessing * of god
may-they-be * on-you * all * together
on-your * children * on-your * offspring * without * sorrow
not-to-them · may-happen * calamity)

Man's blessing and God's blessing,
may they all be on you together,
on your children, on your offspring unscathed,
may no calamity befall them.

A blessing bestowed by St. Colmán in Betha Colmáin maic Lúacháin, as edited by Kuno Meyer in No. 17 of the Todd Lecture Series.

Sét no·tíag...

Sét no·tíag,
téiti Críst;
crích i mbéo,
bith cen tríst.

(path * that I go
Christ * goes;
land * in * which I am
let it be * without * curse)

The path I walk,
Christ walks;
The land I am in,
let it not be blighted.

This is the first stanza of a poem attributed to Colum Cille, edited by James Carney in "Three Old Irish accentual poems" in Ériu, xxii (1971).

Trí bás úaim rohuccaiter...

Trí bás úaim rohuccaiter!
Trí áes dom dorataiter!
Secht tonna tacid dom dorodailter!

(three * death(s) * from me * may they be taken
threee * age(s) * to me * may they be given
seven * waves * of good fortune * to me * may they be poured out)

May three deaths be taken from me!
May three ages be given to me!
May seven waves of fortune be granted to me!

These lines are part of a much longer prayer for long life which begins "Ad·muiniur secht n-ingena trethan" ("I invoke the seven daughters of the sea"). Kuno Meyer edited and translated it for the first time in "Miscellanea Hibernica", where he attributed it to Fer fio macc Fabri. P. L. Henry also edited and translated it in "Dánta Ban".

For another portion of this "ortha" (poem or incantation), see "Ropo chétach cétblíadnach" in this collection.

Ropo chétach cétblíadnach...

Ropo chétach cétblíadnach, cech cét diib ar úair.

(may I be * hundredfold * hundred years * each * hundred * of them * by * time)

May I live for a hundred times a hundred years, each hundred of them in turn!

This supplication comes from a longer "ortha" (poem or incantation) for long life which begins "Ad·muiniur secht n-ingena trethan" ("I invoke the seven daughters of the sea"). Kuno Meyer edited and translated it in "Miscellanea Hibernica" and attributed it to Fer fio macc Fabri. P. L. Henry edited and translated it again much later in "Dánta Ban".

For another selection from this "ortha" , see "Trí bás úaim rohuccaiter" in this collection.

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